Photo, above: House Speaker Paul Rino, accompanied by Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. A government-wide spending bill that President Donald Trump criticized Tuesday morning but now calls “a clear win for the American people” was passed by the House on Wednesday. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

This is horrible. I am speechless.

A Republican president, a Republican House, a Republican Senate, and an overwhelming Democrat victory. What is wrong with this picture?

Republicans and Democrats linked arms Wednesday to pass a $1 trillion spending bill to fund the government for the rest of the fiscal year, brushing aside President Trump’s calls for fiscal restraint and spreading cash across their favored programs, reports The Washington Times.

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The 310-117 vote was a major victory for Democrats, who not only blocked most of Mr. Trump’s campaign promises, but increased spending on everything from the arts to medical research.

Republicans, meanwhile, touted a $1.5 billion injection of money into immigration enforcement and $15 billion more for the Pentagon, which they said they secured without having to match it dollar-for-dollar with domestic spending.

“This marks the beginning of a new era. No longer will the needs our military be held hostage,” said House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, Wisconsin Republican.

Senators still need to vote on the bill, then it goes to Mr. Trump for his signature. All sides are rushing a Friday deadline to beat a government shutdown.

Democrats were nearly unified, with 178 of them backing the legislation and just 15 opposed. Republicans were more divided on the bill, with 132 of them voting in favor and 117 opposed.