Savannah, Georgia has a problem. Racism. Not against blacks, but, rather, against whites. The perpetrators of the racism appear to believe that their discrimination against whites is not racism at all, as racism against whites, a minority in Savannah, is simply business as usual and perfectly acceptable.

In an effort to rig the upcoming mayoral election, a black leader in the community, Rev. Clarence Teddy Williams, has organized a political event at his church and has invited the black candidates for mayor to attend to discuss their platforms and agendas. Members of the press have also been invited…. unless they happen to be white. A sign on the entrance door of the church (photo, above) reads, “Black Press Only!”

Rev. Williams may be a racist but he isn’t stupid. Neither is he holding this event as a community service. He is holding the event because he wants a black mayor. There are currently three black candidates intending to run for mayor of Savannah, which is 53% black and 35% white. The good reverend is attempting to reduce the number of black candidates in the mayoral race to one so as to not split the black vote which would virtually guarantee the reelection of the white incumbent mayor, Eddie DeLoach.

Trending: Tick, tock! President Trump declassifies FISA apps & all Russia-related texts from Comey, Strzok, Page, McCabe, and Ohr. Seditious conspiracy!

In the audio, below, one of the black candidates for mayor of Savannah, Van Johnson promoted his vision for a more “inclusive and progressive” Savannah. Then, when asked by a reporter if he thought prohibiting whites is inclusive and progressive, clueless Johnson asserted, “This is America. I think people have the right to be able to assemble and determine the rules of their assembly” (like prohibiting non-blacks from attending).

take our poll - story continues below

Have smartphones made the world better or worse?

  • Have smartphones made the world better or worse?  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Powdered Wig Society updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Rev. Williams’ attempt to convince the black community to choose a single black candidate to ensure a black mayor is racist at its core and has no place in America or any civilized society.

Savannah and America would be far better off if Rev. Williams and racists like him understood and practiced Dr. Martin Luther King’s dream of a nation where people are not judged by the color of their skin, but rather by “the content of their character.”

From Savannah Morning News

Race was front and center on Wednesday night during a meeting coordinated to garner support for just one black candidate in Savannah’s mayoral election.

With signs stating “Black press only” on the doors of the church where the meeting was held, white reporters were barred from entry, while black reporters for at least two television stations were permitted inside.

The event was coordinated by the Rev. Clarence Teddy Williams, owner of the consulting firm, The Trigon Group, who declined to discuss the entry policy.

Former Savannah Mayor Edna Jackson declined to comment before going inside, as did Chatham County Commissioner Chester Ellis.

“This is not my idea,” Ellis said.

Savannah Alderman Estella Shabazz, who also attended, said that she had once owned a newspaper and she was a member of the black press, but she declined to comment – when repeatedly pressed – on the policy barring white reporters from going inside.

While notes were allowed, photos, video and audio recordings were prohibited during the event, according to Stephen Moody, an African-American reporter with WJCL who was allowed entry. Another reporter from WSAV who attended the meeting was told she could stay because she was black, Moody said.

Shirley James, the African-American publisher of the black-owned Savannah Tribune, was also seen going into the meeting.

Savannah Alderman Van Johnson, who is one of three African-Americans who have stated their intention to run for mayor, said afterwards that during the meeting he had talked about his vision for an inclusive and progressive Savannah. With regards to the discriminatory policy at the door, Johnson said that he believed people have the right to assemble and determine the rules of their assembly.

“It’s not my meeting,” Johnson said. “I was asked to come and give a statement, so I came and I gave a statement. What I said in there, I’ll say out here.”

Louis Wilson, who said he is going to run for mayor again after an unsuccessful run in 2015, also spoke during the meeting about his priorities. Afterwards, Wilson also declined to discuss the press restriction.

“I didn’t plan the meeting so I can’t comment on that part,” he said. “I came to say what I had to say.”

Former state senator and representative Regina Thomas, who has announced her own campaign, did not attend the meeting. In an interview earlier this week, Thomas said she believes she can win, even if there is another black candidate.

“I’m encouraged every day by people of all persuasions,” Thomas said.

Meeting attendees were given a handout reporting the ethnic composition of Savannah’s population, as well as a vote breakdown for the 2015 election – when incumbent Jackson was defeated in a run-off by current Mayor Eddie DeLoach.

Also distributed was an editorial in the black-owned Savannah Herald titled “United We Win, Divided We Lose” that was written by former Mayor Otis Johnson. In the piece, Johnson called on the black population to organize itself to increase its influence over what happens in the community, starting with the mayor and council.

“If we come together and decide what we want and who we believe will work best for us to get it, then we have a chance to advance,” he said.

Savannah Alderman Estella Shabazz, who also attended, said that she had once owned a newspaper and she was a member of the black press, but she declined to comment – when repeatedly pressed – on the policy barring white reporters from going inside.

While notes were allowed, photos, video and audio recordings were prohibited during the event, according to Stephen Moody, an African-American reporter with WJCL who was allowed entry. Another reporter from WSAV who attended the meeting was told she could stay because she was black, Moody said.

Shirley James, the African-American publisher of the black-owned Savannah Tribune, was also seen going into the meeting.

Savannah Alderman Van Johnson, who is one of three African-Americans who have stated their intention to run for mayor, said afterwards that during the meeting he had talked about his vision for an inclusive and progressive Savannah. With regards to the discriminatory policy at the door, Johnson said that he believed people have the right to assemble and determine the rules of their assembly.

“It’s not my meeting,” Johnson said. “I was asked to come and give a statement, so I came and I gave a statement. What I said in there, I’ll say out here.”

Louis Wilson, who said he is going to run for mayor again after an unsuccessful run in 2015, also spoke during the meeting about his priorities. Afterwards, Wilson also declined to discuss the press restriction.

“I didn’t plan the meeting so I can’t comment on that part,” he said. “I came to say what I had to say.”

Former state senator and representative Regina Thomas, who has announced her own campaign, did not attend the meeting. In an interview earlier this week, Thomas said she believes she can win, even if there is another black candidate.

“I’m encouraged every day by people of all persuasions,” Thomas said.

Meeting attendees were given a handout reporting the ethnic composition of Savannah’s population, as well as a vote breakdown for the 2015 election – when incumbent Jackson was defeated in a run-off by current Mayor Eddie DeLoach.

Also distributed was an editorial in the black-owned Savannah Herald titled “United We Win, Divided We Lose” that was written by former Mayor Otis Johnson. In the piece, Johnson called on the black population to organize itself to increase its influence over what happens in the community, starting with the mayor and council.

“If we come together and decide what we want and who we believe will work best for us to get it, then we have a chance to advance,” he said.