Chalk one up for the good guys. In a federal court ruling this week, Judge Richard J. Leon ruled that states have every right to demand proof of citizenship for those registering to vote.

Spanking Barack Hussein and the brain-dead liberals who have been all about allowing illegals to vote, dead folks to vote, anyone to vote who is likely to vote for Democrats, Judge Leon took an important step in allowing election officials to get a handle on what is becoming an ever more serious voter fraud problem.

Surely, the liberal plaintiffs in the case were indignant by the Judge’s ruling, citing, no doubt, the extreme burden certain members of our society will be subjected to having to prove their citizenship. Just explaining the process to them will be a tremendous burden on officials. GMAFB!

Countering that argument in advance, the judge declared, “The organizational plaintiffs and their members will undoubtedly have to expend some additional time and effort to help individuals. But let’s be candid: doing so pales in comparison to explaining to the average citizen how the [Affordable Care Act] or tax code works!”

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BOOM!

From The Washington Times

Kansas, Alabama and Georgia can demand their residents submit proof of citizenship before signing up to vote even if they’re using the federal government’s registration forms, a judge said Wednesday, delivering a win to states concerned about voter fraud.

The League of Women Voters and the Obama administration had tried to halt the practice, arguing that federal law doesn’t require an extensive citizenship check when people register to vote, and saying the three states were imposing an extra burden on voters.

But Judge Richard J. Leon said that while it may be an inconvenience to require proof of citizenship, and voter registration drives may have to do more work to get folks signed up, it’s not an insurmountable burden — and certainly less so than trying to explain Obamacare.

“The organizational plaintiffs and their members will undoubtedly have to expend some additional time and effort to help individuals,” Judge Leon wrote. “But let’s be candid: doing so pales in comparison to explaining to the average citizen how the [Affordable Care Act] or tax code works!”

Since the voter groups didn’t show a real and irreparable harm, he rejected their request for a preliminary injunction.

The ruling is the latest in a years-long struggle by some states to combat potential voter fraud by insisting voters prove they are citizens. In one Kansas count alone, officials count 25 instances of non-citizens attempting to register to vote.

“This is a very real problem and the only way to solve the problem is to require proof of citizenship on the front end,” said Kris W. Kobach, Kansas’ secretary of state.

Voting rights groups dismiss those concerns, saying the bigger problem is barriers that prevent eligible voters from registering and showing up on Election Day. They and the Obama administration said requiring proof of citizenship adds to the burden, and said an oath affirming citizenship should be good enough.

The voting-rights groups said they are confident in their case, and they’d already begun to set up an appeal.

“While we are disappointed in today’s decision, we will appeal to protect the critical rights of voters in these three states, especially during this election year,” said Chris Carson, president of the League of Women Voters.

Hours before Judge Leon’s ruling, the voting-rights groups had filed a request for a new hearing to pressure him to decide, saying that time is running out to get folks registered for the November elections. Figuring they knew the outcome of his decision, they wanted to ensure they had enough time to appeal.

Read more at The Washington Times