New Law Against Face Covering Seen As Anti-Muslim

From Free Patriot

By Rick Wells 9/25/2013

02 veil

In Southern Switzerland, voters have approved a ban on masks or other means by which to hide one’s face on public highways, public places, or places offering a public service. The prohibition makes an exception for a place of worship and offers protections against one person forcing another to cover their face based upon gender.
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Similar laws have already been implemented in France and Belgium. Opposition, including Amnesty International, views the law to be discriminatory against the rights of Muslims, who comprise roughly 5 percent of the Swiss population, at approximately 400,000.

Although the proposed legislation received over the two-thirds affirmative public support, it still must be federally approved.

The chief sponsor of the proposal, Giorgio Ghirighelli, proclaimed the action as being directed towards “Islamic fundamentalists” in his district, as well as throughout the country.

“Those who want to integrate are welcome irrespective of their religion,” Ghiringhelli stated on the Il Guastafeste website. “But those who rebuff our values and aim to build a parallel society based on religious laws, and want to place it over our society, are not welcome.”

The Central Islamic Council decried the action as Islamophobic, although the law does not specifically identify Muslims as being targeted.

The proposal was created under the auspices of Switzerland’s structure of direct democracy, which provides for propositions to be placed for a vote if signatory thresholds are reached.